"Embody/Object"

Posted on: May 5, 2017
Views: 1171

Description

My current body of work, Embody/Object, combines an interest of salvaged objects, inherent vs. applied color, and the philosophy and language embedded within form and material. Stemming from memories attached to powerful architecture and expanding into the field of Feminist approaches to structure, the sculptures I manifest are investigations of bringing emotion and character into cold, manufactured forms. Can sentiment be applied to the inanimacy of an object?
This process of research began with the realization that every material sends a message to its viewer. Simplifying sculpture down to minimal surfaces and color allows for the eye to not only see the structure as a whole, but to go further into concept and reveal properties that might otherwise get lost. I find that it?s often the quieter pieces that end up speaking louder. This outlook has lead me to examine many post-Minimalist philosophies and the layers of intricacy inside each material application. Ultimately, I have discovered mundane materials are sometimes the most ambiguous, as they tell some of the greatest stories.

photos by Probably Joel




Other Projects by Eden McDowell

Eden McDowell

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BFA Student

Major: Sculpture

Graduation Year: 2017


Artist Statement:

Materials provide a certain extension to my thoughts that cannot otherwise be interpreted via language or two dimensional representation. It’s the stark presence of an object in space that evokes a personified gesture irresistible to explore. It’s the fact that we can see, touch, and walk around something nonfunctional, yet recognizable and undefined. These sensory outputs come from my interest in seeing Minimalism in a contemporary, reworked, and elevated context—the theory that once color and materiality is applied to a Minimalist form, it no longer abides by the resistance of traditional Minimalist artists.
I’m figuring out structure as if it were skin and bones, starting with color and material, then determining its form and scale. This process provides an organic and feminine context to the cold essence of manufactured structures—a process unlike the approach of many sculptors from the era of minimal transcendance. Simplifying sculpture down to limited surfaces and color allows for the eye to not only see the structure as a whole, but to go further into concept and reveal properties that might otherwise get lost. Yet, I believe that a strong form can evoke emotion, color, and texture without trying too hard. It’s the balance of simplicity and intricacy that fuels my sculptural practice.

https://portfolio.meca.edu/
https://portfolio.meca.edu/